Albuquerque Meals Financial institution is working to get care packages for individuals in want in the course of the coronavirus pandemic

Food banks across the country are starting to feel the pain of the coronavirus pandemic. People pack grocery stores to buy groceries and supplies, while Albuquerque volunteers work hard at the Roadrunner Food Bank to pack groceries for those in need. Food banks are an emergency service. Roadrunner didn’t have to reduce or limit a lot. “I’ve been coming very regularly and very regularly for two years, three or four days a week,” said volunteer Susan Denniston. Staff and volunteers are still practicing social distancing and trying to stay healthy. Wearing gloves and washing hands is nothing new in the grocery bank. Usually volunteers grab a pair of gloves to put on before starting work. Every day they fill boxes of groceries and supplies for families across the state. Some of these boxes go to families and people who cannot find what they need in grocery stores. “Not many people alive today have ever experienced a crisis like this. Empty shelves, no food in the shops, that was the line you heard so often in England after the war. There is no food in the shops “said Denniston. There are six boxes on each pallet, and volunteers have filled dozens. The only change they have made to keep practicing social distancing is to send boxes to distribution centers instead of people coming one by one to pick items, I just find it a valuable service. I love being of service, and I can’t think of a finer effort to put my time and energy into it, “Denniston said. Roadrunner Food Bank said as long as it can volunteer it will. If you want to help, the food bank accepts donations and non-perishable food, click here to learn more about how to donate.

Food banks across the country are starting to feel the pain of the coronavirus pandemic. People pack grocery stores to buy groceries and supplies, while Albuquerque volunteers work hard at the Roadrunner Food Bank to pack groceries for those in need.

Food banks are an emergency service. Roadrunner didn’t have to reduce or limit a lot.

“I’ve been coming very regularly and very regularly for two years, three or four days a week,” said volunteer Susan Denniston.

Staff and volunteers are still practicing social distancing and trying to stay healthy. Wearing gloves and washing hands is nothing new in the grocery bank. Usually volunteers grab a pair of gloves to put on before starting work. Every day they fill boxes of groceries and supplies for families across the state. Some of these boxes go to families and people who cannot find what they need in grocery stores.

“Not many people alive today have ever experienced a crisis like this. Empty shelves, no food in the shops, that was the line you heard so often in England after the war. There is no food in the shops “said Denniston.

Thirty-six boxes fit on each pallet, and volunteers have filled dozens. The only change they made to continue practicing social distancing is to send boxes to distribution centers instead of people coming one by one to pick items.

“Helping with food shortages, especially for people who are either quarantined at home and don’t get much to eat anyway, is just a valuable service for me. I love being of service, and I can’t think of a better me try to put my time and energy into it, “Denniston said.

Roadrunner Food Bank said as long as it can work with volunteers it will. If you want to help, the food bank accepts donations and non-perishable food. Click here to learn more about how to donate.

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