Meals truck pods are parked throughout Albuquerque

Food truck takeover

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abqfoodcarts.com
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The Talin Market Food Truck Pod meets for lunch on Wednesdays.

Mina Yamashita

It is Wednesday at noon. Half a dozen food trucks line the parking lot at Talin Market, ready to serve more than the usual hot dog. I’m here to try the goods, starting with The Chopping Blocks soft fish taco topped with mango salsa. I wash it down with organic lemonade at Make My Lunch, then go to Oz Patisseries Over-the-Top Desserts for some of the best creme brulee I’ve had in town.

I go back in line and try a Bill’s BBQ Pulled Pork Burrito and get through half the generous serving. The rest will be my dinner. Alison’s truck has to wait until next week. I hardly have room for a shave ice cream at Coconut Mike, where I immediately get addicted to the Piña Colada. Total tab: $ 16.

This is a capsule – a convergence of several food trucks parked in one place. Individual trucks also show up across town, mostly for lunch and dinner. Burqueños are already used to dining at hot dog stands, paleta carts, and burrito trucks, but these mobile kitchens offer upscale, innovative dishes – and the people who run them mean business.

I wash it down with organic lemonade at Make My Lunch, then go to Oz Patisseries Over-the-Top Desserts for some of the best creme brulee I’ve had in town.

The movement first arose in avant-garde cities like Austin and Portland. For some owners, being able to pick up and switch locations is the answer to a worrying economy. These entrepreneurs also have a strong independent influence – they work for themselves in areas they love.

Steps, a resource team for entrepreneurs, opened doors to Albuquerque’s food truck industry in 2010 with a series of workshops focused on developing mobile kitchen models. The non-profit organization was founded in 2006 to promote business development in Albuquerques Southeast Heights. The first pod was launched on the Talin market in March to take advantage of the region’s international flair. The idea grew and now Steps offers advice and coaching for the entire Bernalillo County.

Cynthia Beiser, Managing Director of Steps, tells me that anyone with a good idea can come to Steps – including architects, artists and owners of food trucks. Workshops provide guidance on business plans, funding, marketing, and obtaining permits and regulations, as well as a network of resources to turn ideas into reality. Councilor Rey Garduño’s City Food Cart Task Force now counts Steps as a member.

The pods grow and park in different locations throughout the week. The Talin Market (Central, Louisiana) pod meets on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 or 3 p.m. Office workers near Masthead in Jefferson can choose from several trucks parked there around noon on Thursdays and Fridays. And the Downtown Growers’ Market collects one of its own on Saturday mornings: breakfast could be a Firenze Mobile wood-burning ranchero pizza – red sauce, mozzarella, green chilli, Keller’s hot sausage, and a free-range egg – topped off with a fresh pressed! sweet lime.

The trucks

Mina Yamashita

Check for schedules, menus, and location updates online. The truck season usually ends in late October, but most offer catering and special event services. There are many more trucks. So if you have a favorite, let us know. Leave a comment on this article on alibi.com or send an email to [email protected]

Alison is

280-98234
twitter.com/alisonshsc

Saul and Alison Samario are familiar faces near the Sunport neighborhood, where they park their trucks most days. They’ve added the Talin capsule to their locations and serve traditional New Mexico dishes in a bespoke mobile restaurant with a hand-carved door and vigas.

Big John’s BBQ

203-1539
on.fb.me/bigjohnsbbq

on.fb.me/bigjohnsbbq

John has been making a lip lick grill for 30 years. If you’re lucky, you can get to his truck before he runs out of your favorite meat. You can call ahead to check. Find him on the corner of Montgomery and Carlisle.

Bill’s BBQ

362-0412, [email protected]

Bill and Cynthia talk about food trucks.

Bill and Cynthia talk about food trucks.

Mina Yamashita

Bill Porter parks a grill smoker next to his food truck. The smell of ribs, turkey legs, roasted corn and pulled pork will beckon you there.

The mobile kitchen of the chopping block

280-1153, [email protected]
thechoppingblockcatering.com
on.fb.me/thechoppingblock

Mina Yamashita

Chef Shay Patchell from Chopping Block Catering launched the mobile kitchen “Julia” in the summer of 2010. Its varied menu includes sandwiches, burgers, fish tacos, and more.

Coconut Mike’s Tropical Sno

367-4267, [email protected]

I caught Mike Frazier after three 15-hour days ice shaving in Los Altos Park for a tournament with 70 Native American softball teams. At Coconut Mike’s, the 26 syrups are all pure cane sugar, not corn syrup here.

Florence: A mobile wood-fired pizza

688-0571, [email protected]
firenzemobilepizza.com
on.fb.me/mobilewoodfiredpizza

Mina Yamashita

Steven and Felicia Meyer have had their own wood-burning stove with them since April. They give every place the scent of burning hardwood. Made with local and natural ingredients, this mobile pizzeria is set up outdoors and serves artisanal pizza on site.

Freshly squeezed!

453-5081, [email protected]
on.fb.me/freshsqueezed

Mina Yamashita

When she takes time out from scouting locations for Breaking Bad and In Plain Sight, Cyndy McCrossen performs Fresh Squeezed! with their children Penelope and Weston. They serve lemonade and lemonade, New York style custards, and European style hot dogs.

Eat good food here

604-9924, [email protected]
on.fb.me/goodfoodeathere

Mina Yamashita

Vegetarian, raw and / or vegan products are the mainstay of this grass-green truck. There is a changing selection of hot sandwiches, raw desserts, smoothies and some surprising offerings (like pulled BBQ jackfruit tacos). “Not the old brown hippie food from the seventies,” announces the Facebook page. “Neon food from the future of food at a price so everyone can come back twenty or thirty times a month.”

Make my lunch

450-9507, [email protected]
makemylunchcallie.com
on.fb.me/makemylunch

Mina Yamashita

Callie started her food truck to expand a bespoke lunch delivery service. With her sister Jo lending a hand, Callie now joins the pods in Talin and Masthead and delivers a menu of healthy, local and organic sandwiches, soups, salads and snacks.

Oz Patisserie Mobile Dessert Truck

659-6452, [email protected]
ozpatisserie.com
on.fb.me/ozpatisserie

Gary J. Ele’s desserts have gained a loyal following. Several customers told me they make the best brownies in town. There are also cookies, cakes and a creme brulee to die for.

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