Rally for Peace and Justice in downtown Albuquerque

Celebrating diversity and at the same time protesting against racism – that was the aim of a rally and a march on Saturday in the town square in Albuquerque. The organizers said it was important that the speakers be of different races, ages and backgrounds. “We have faith leaders. We have citizens. We have community activists. We have Millennials, we have Gen X people like me, older people, and the combination of all of these views and perspectives we think is a really powerful message, ”said Sean Cardinalli of New Mexico. Truth to Power New Mexico has partnered with the local chapter of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE 480) to host the event. Union officials said the walls that divide must continue to be torn down: “I’ve been with the union for about seven years, and like in many industries, I’m the only one at the table, and one of the things my grandmother used to tell me is that your job is to say why, if you’re the only one at the table I’m the only one at the table, “said Belle Allen of IATSE 480. This diversity continues to grow.” We hope that ours Presence here inspires other industries, other unions and other companies to embrace the message, ”said IATSE 480 Derek M. Chavez. Once the speakers finished, the group began to march from Civic Plaza to Washington Middle School Park and back. And while the march was ending, they said the move couldn’t. “We keep the conversation going. We just keep making this positive progress and working to be better for every person we meet, ”said Malcolm Shelby of Dukes Up Guns Down. This includes voting for the November elections. If you don’t vote and make a decision of conscience not to show up, you make the decision of conscience to have those changes stop, ”said Mason Graham, of the New Mexico Black Voter Collaboration. The protest was also unique in that they had a booth where people could register to vote.

Celebrating diversity and at the same time protesting against racism – that was the aim of a rally and a march on Saturday in the town square in Albuquerque.

The organizers said it was important that the speakers were of different races, ages and backgrounds.

“We have faith leaders. We have citizens. We have community activists. We have Millennials, we have Gen X people like me, older people, and the combination of all of these views and perspectives we think is a really powerful message, ”said Sean Cardinalli of Truth to Power New Mexico.

Truth to Power New Mexico has partnered with the local chapter of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE 480) to host the event.

Union officials said that dividing walls must continue to be torn down.

“I’ve been in the union for about seven years, and like many other industries, I’m the only one at the table and my grandmother used to tell me if you’re the only one when you’re at the table, it’s your job to say why I am I’m the only one at the table, ”said IATSE 480’s Belle Allen.

This diversity is also increasing.

“We hope our presence here inspires other industries, other unions and other companies to take on the message,” said Derek M. Chavez of IATSE 480.

As soon as the speakers finished, the group marched from Civic Plaza to Washington Middle School Park and back.

And while the march was ending, they said the move couldn’t.

“We keep the conversation going. We just keep making positive progress and working to be better for everyone we meet, ”said Malcolm Shelby of Dukes Up Guns Down.

This includes voting for the November elections.

“When we have people who don’t vote and make a choice of conscience not to show up, then make the choice of conscience to stop those changes,” said Mason Graham, of the New Mexico Black Voter Collaboration.

The protest was also unique in that they had a booth where people could register to vote.

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